Prunus ‘Berry’ CASCADE SNOW ™

Japanese flowering cherry

  • © J. Frank Schmidt & Son Co.

Outstanding Qualities

Prunus 'Berry' CASCADE SNOW(TM) is one of the most disease-resistant ornamental cherries available for the Northwest landscape. It is particularly well adapted to landscapes on the west side of the Cascade and Coast ranges, both for its ornamental qualities and for its demonstrated resistance to brown rot and shot hole diseases that plague most of the other cherries in our climate. In spring the tree is covered with large, single, snow-white blossoms. The foliage that follows is dark green and looks great throughout the summer. In autumn the leaves change to shades of yellow and bronzy orange. The parent plant of this cultivar is at the Berry Botanic Garden in Portland, Oregon. There it has long been admired by visitors for its year-round beauty. The tree was originally imported from Japan, but records were since lost. It may in fact be an old Japanese cultivar. The original tree was propagated and those plants were put through extensive trials for nearly a decade to verify its disease-resistant qualities. CASCADE SNOW(TM) can be used as a street tree or incorporated into any sunny spot in the garden.

Quick Facts

Plant Type: columnar tree

Foliage Type: deciduous

Plant Height: 18 ft. 0 in. (5.49 meters)

Plant Width/Spread: 18 ft. 0 in. (5.49 meters)

Plant Height-Mature: 25 ft. 0 in. (7.62 meters)

Plant Width-Mature: 20 ft. 0 in. (6.10 meters)

Hardiness: USDA Zones 5 to 9

Flower Color: white

Sun/Light Exposure:

Water Requirements:

Seasonal Interest: autumn color

Colors & Combos

Great Color Contrasts: purple, bronze, chartreuse

Great Color Partners: white, pink, dark green

Culture Notes
This flowering cherry grows best in full sun. It prefers well-drained soil, but will tolerate sand and clay if drainage is adequate. Once it is established it is drought tolerant, but it does appreciate occasional watering during dry weather. It is noted for its disease resistance and tolerance of our wet cool spring weather. It has a naturally graceful layered branching habit and needs almost no pruning to achieve this shape. Pruning should be limited to the removal of dead, broken or poorly formed branches. Consult an experienced pruner or take local classes before attempting further pruning.