Corylopsis spicata ‘Golden Spring’

golden winterhazel

  • © Briggs Plant Propagators

Outstanding Qualities

One of the finest qualities of winterhazel is the bright primrose yellow flowers in late winter. Golden winterhazel adds to an already outstanding ornamental with flashy yellow foliage. There is some confusion over the appropriate name for this plant and it can sometimes be sold as Corylopsis spicata 'Aurea'. In spring the new foliage emerges acid yellow with a tint if red and orange, quickly maturing to a fresh canary yellow. The brilliant foliage will hold its color well into summer in half day sun, in more shade it will fade to a lovely chartreuse. Older shrubs develop a graceful layered branching pattern that will show the dangling chains of winter flowers to perfection. In fall tones of yellow and orange are predominate in the autumnal show. Use in open shady woodland to lighten the heavy greens of conifers. Combine with the deep shiny greens of Beesia deltophylla or ferns like Polystichum neolobatum.

Quick Facts

Plant Type: shrub

Foliage Type: deciduous

Plant Height: 4 ft. 0 in. (1.22 meters)

Plant Width/Spread: 4 ft. 0 in. (1.22 meters)

Plant Height-Mature: 0 ft. 0 in. (0.00 meters)

Plant Width-Mature: 0 ft. 0 in. (0.00 meters)

Hardiness: USDA Zones 6 to 9

Flower Color: yellow

Sun/Light Exposure: light to dappled shade

Water Requirements: occasional watering

Seasonal Interest: charming late winter flowers & golden foliage in spring and summer

Colors & Combos

Great Color Contrasts: orange, purple, lavender

Great Color Partners: yellow, gold, dark green

Culture Notes
Plant 'Golden Spring' in a spot with light, open, or dappled shade and rich, well-drained soil. The foliage will be brighter in light shade than sites with more shade. This plant grows best with at least occasional watering during dry weather. Avoid full sun and hot locations to prevent burning the foliage in summer. It has a naturally graceful habit and needs little pruning.
Geek Notes
'Golden Spring' was discovered in a controlled planting of Corylopsis spicata by Seiju Yamaguchi in Gifu Prefecture, Japan. The cultivar was issued United States Plant Patent number 13,821 on May 20, 2003 to Hines Nursery, Inc., Irvine, California.